[woubit] That a cherry was as red Log Out | Topics | Search
Moderators | Register | Edit Profile

Lateral Puzzles » Solved Lateral Thinking Puzzles » Solved Puzzles - August 2007 » [woubit] That a cherry was as red « Previous Next »

Author Message
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 60
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Thursday, August 23, 2007 - 12:25 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Overweight
Sixtyeight (Sixtyeight)
New member
Username: Sixtyeight

Post Number: 439
Registered: 6-2007
Posted on Thursday, August 23, 2007 - 1:21 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

does Overweight refer to a
person?
animal?
life form?
truck?
vehicle?
something for transporting something?
something that carries weight?
the weight of something?
the weight limit of something?
was something or someone labeled overweight by a person?
if the statement was made into a basic complete sentence which tense would be most fitting... past tense? present tense? future?

would any of these verbs be suitable..
was? wasn't? became? looked? felt? had been? shouldn't be? should be? ___overweight
is overweight a noun or verb in this statement?

is something as heavy as a cherry is red?
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 61
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Thursday, August 23, 2007 - 1:58 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

does Overweight refer to a
person?
animal?
life form?
truck?
vehicle?
something for transporting something?
something that carries weight?
the weight of something? this is closest, for svv of "something"
the weight limit of something?
was something or someone labeled overweight by a person? noish
if the statement was made into a basic complete sentence which tense would be most fitting... past tense? present tense? this one future?

would any of these verbs be suitable..
was? this one wasn't? became? looked? felt? had been? shouldn't be? should be? ___overweight
is overweight a noun or verb in this statement? overweight is an adjective in every statement containing the word that I have ever encountered. It is so here.

is something as heavy as a cherry is red? Who fished the murex up?
Rabrab (Rabrab)
New member
Username: Rabrab

Post Number: 1586
Registered: 2-2005
Posted on Thursday, August 23, 2007 - 5:45 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Weightless poetry relevant?
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 62
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Thursday, August 23, 2007 - 10:50 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Weightless poetry relevant? very much so
Crazypalpig (Crazypalpig)
New member
Username: Crazypalpig

Post Number: 1413
Registered: 8-2006
Posted on Thursday, August 23, 2007 - 12:04 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is this your second one about weightless poetry? like your wait-less poetry?

Do you want us to find the proper ending for your title?
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 63
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Thursday, August 23, 2007 - 12:54 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is this your second one about weightless poetry? like your wait-less poetry? I don't know how many puzzles I have posted that are actually about weightless poetry. But I was reminded of the topic while reading the Chatroom.

Do you want us to find the proper ending for your title? that would hardly be a Lateral Thinking Puzzle
Sixtyeight (Sixtyeight)
New member
Username: Sixtyeight

Post Number: 442
Registered: 6-2007
Posted on Thursday, August 23, 2007 - 1:03 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Does overweight have anything to do with physical weight in the puzzle? figurative weight?

does overweight refer to something intangible?

is a red object relevant?
something which can be labeled "red"?
any other color relevant?
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 64
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Thursday, August 23, 2007 - 1:05 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Does overweight have anything to do with physical weight in the puzzle? no figurative weight? yes

does overweight refer to something intangible? yes

is a red object relevant? no
something which can be labeled "red"? no, but in a curious sort of way, thinking along these lines may assist you
any other color relevant? yesish, in the same curious sort of way
Lynne (Lynne)
New member
Username: Lynne

Post Number: 3307
Registered: 12-2000
Posted on Thursday, August 23, 2007 - 2:10 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

any other color relevant? yesish

Roses are reddish, violets are blueish?
Zenith (Zenith)
New member
Username: Zenith

Post Number: 449
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Thursday, August 23, 2007 - 2:30 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is the etymology of a word or phrase relevent?
Is Ambrose Phillips relevent?
or 'Airy-fairy'?

Is music relevent?
Any soaring soprano lines?

Is there a dichotomy between a piece of poetry, written as 'weightless' and how it's percieved? or visa versa? for example, some nursary rhymes, which if you think about the inspiration (or attributed inspiration), they harldy seem suitable for the context in which they are usually recited in.
Booklover (Booklover)
New member
Username: Booklover

Post Number: 611
Registered: 4-2007
Posted on Thursday, August 23, 2007 - 3:47 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

not sure if this is actually weightless, but talk of "red" reminded me of william carlos williams (is he relevant)?

The Red Wheelbarrow

So much depends
upon

a red wheel
barrow

glazed with rain
water

beside the white
chickens.
Beccaann (Beccaann)
New member
Username: Beccaann

Post Number: 1565
Registered: 6-2006
Posted on Thursday, August 23, 2007 - 4:06 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Aw, you beat me to it! I was trying to think of a good puzzle about weightless poetry. It's yet to come to me. All that comes to me is this:

This poem weighs
an awful lot.
Or so I thought.
But maybe not.


As for your puzzle:

Is a particular poet relevant?
A particular poem?
If so, is the poem weightless? Weighty? Overweight for a particular purpose?
Beccaann (Beccaann)
New member
Username: Beccaann

Post Number: 1566
Registered: 6-2006
Posted on Thursday, August 23, 2007 - 4:10 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I know I've read your title before, byt he way, and I'm racking my brain to remember what poem it's from.

Will it help to know that poem?
Rabrab (Rabrab)
New member
Username: Rabrab

Post Number: 1589
Registered: 2-2005
Posted on Thursday, August 23, 2007 - 8:17 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It's A Song About Myself by John Keats.

Is it that Keats didn't write much that would be considered weightless poetry, so that due to his reputation as a serious poet, even a poem that would be considered weightless by most standards is taken very seriously?

Or that the title is easily confused with a very weighty poem indeed, Whitman's A Song Of Myself?
Beccaann (Beccaann)
New member
Username: Beccaann

Post Number: 1567
Registered: 6-2006
Posted on Thursday, August 23, 2007 - 8:19 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Rabrab. That was driving me crazy and I felt like Googling would be cheating!
Rabrab (Rabrab)
New member
Username: Rabrab

Post Number: 1590
Registered: 2-2005
Posted on Thursday, August 23, 2007 - 8:48 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thank Sister Emily, who had us memorize it when I was back in high school. I've lost a lot of it, but I still remember chunks of the last stanza, the name, and the poet.
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 65
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Thursday, August 23, 2007 - 10:22 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Lynne

any other color relevant? yesish

Roses are reddish, violets are blueish? and if it wasn't for Jesus, we'd all be Jewish... but this particular piece of weightless poetry is not relevant

Zenith

Is the etymology of a word this one, to an extent or phrase relevant?
Is Ambrose Phillips relevant? no
or 'Airy-fairy'? no

Is music relevent? no
Any soaring soprano lines? no

Is there a dichotomy between a piece of poetry, written as 'weightless' and how it's percieved? to a large extent yes, but this may perhaps mislead or visa versa? for example, some nursery rhymes, which if you think about the inspiration (or attributed inspiration), they hardly seem suitable for the context in which they are usually recited in. nor this kind of thing, but good thinking

Booklover

not sure if this is actually weightless, but talk of "red" reminded me of william carlos williams (is he relevant)? he is not, mercifully

The Red Wheelbarrow

So much depends
upon

a red wheel
barrow

glazed with rain
water

beside the white
chickens.


you see what I mean

Beccaann

Aw, you beat me to it! I was trying to think of a good puzzle about weightless poetry. It's yet to come to me. All that comes to me is this:

This poem weighs
an awful lot.
Or so I thought.
But maybe not.

It seems to me
a little light -
but then again,
you could be right.

Bonus marks anyway for an excellent composition.


As for your puzzle:

Is a particular poet relevant? yes
A particular poem? yes
If so, is the poem weightless? this one Weighty? no... Overweight for a particular purpose? ...but yes

I know I've read your title before, by he way, and I'm racking my brain to remember what poem it's from. help is at hand - see below

Will it help to know that poem? no

Rabrab

It's A Song About Myself by John Keats. it is indeed

Is it that Keats didn't write much that would be considered weightless poetry, so that due to his reputation as a serious poet, even a poem that would be considered weightless by most standards is taken very seriously? no, for well it was said by the bard:

Byron and Shelley and Keats
Were a trio of lyrical treats.
The forehead of Shelley was covered with curls,
And Keats never was a descendant of earls,
And Byron went out with a number of girls -
But it didn't impair the poetical feats
Of Byron and Shelley,
Of Byron and Shelley,
Of Byron and Shelley and Keats.


Dorothy Parker


Or that the title is easily confused with a very weighty poem indeed, Whitman's A Song Of Myself? no, but more good thinking

Beccaann

Thanks Rabrab. That was driving me crazy and I felt like Googling would be cheating!

Rabrab

Thank Sister Emily, who had us memorize it when I was back in high school. I've lost a lot of it, but I still remember chunks of the last stanza, the name, and the poet.

There was a naughty boy,
And a naughty boy was he,
He ran away to Scotland
The people for to see —
There he found
That the ground
Was as hard,
That a yard
Was as long,
That a song
Was as merry,
That a cherry
Was as red,
That lead
Was as weighty,
That fourscore
Was as eighty,
That a door
Was as wooden
As in England —
So he stood in his shoes
And he wonder’d,
He wonder’d,
He stood in his
Shoes and he wonder’d.


John Keats
Rabrab (Rabrab)
New member
Username: Rabrab

Post Number: 1592
Registered: 2-2005
Posted on Thursday, August 23, 2007 - 10:39 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

So the puzzle is about a particular poem and? or? a particular poet, but not "A Song About Myself" or Keats?

Piet Hein? His Grooks mostly seem like doggerel, but many of them are amazing profound if given a bit of thought.

A PSYCHOLOGICAL TIP

Whenever you're called on to make up your mind,
and you're hampered by not having any,
the best way to solve the dilemma, you'll find,
is simply by spinning a penny.
No -- not so that chance shall decide the affair
while you're passively standing there moping;
but the moment the penny is up in the air,
you suddenly know what you're hoping.


is one of my favorites...
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 66
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Thursday, August 23, 2007 - 10:55 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

So the puzzle is about a particular poem yes and? or? a particular poet, yes, but the poet does not particularly matter but not "A Song About Myself" or Keats? neither of those

Piet Hein? no, but... His Grooks mostly seem like doggerel, but many of them are amazing profound if given a bit of thought. ...bonus marks for mentioning one of the finest poets of his or any other generation. Indeed, he provided the motto for the LTPF:

To make a name for learning
when other roads are barred,
take something very simple
and make it very hard.
Rabrab (Rabrab)
New member
Username: Rabrab

Post Number: 1593
Registered: 2-2005
Posted on Thursday, August 23, 2007 - 11:21 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

A particular weightless poem, overweight for a particular purpose, and somehow related to the etymology of a word...


Well, to home in on the poem, I fear that I must home in on the poet, first. It's just the way my mind stores information.

Is the poet well-known? Or is it that oh-so-prolific fellow Anonymous? or his almost-as-prolific brother, Unknown?

If it's not either of them, is the poet mostly known for weighty poems? or weightless ones?, or both?
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 67
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Thursday, August 23, 2007 - 11:38 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

A particular weightless poem, overweight for a particular purpose, and somehow related to the etymology of a word...

Well, to home in on the poem, I fear that I must home in on the poet, first. It's just the way my mind stores information.

Is the poet well-known? reasonably so Or is it that oh-so-prolific fellow Anonymous? no or his almost-as-prolific brother, Unknown? no, nor any of that famous quartet:

Anon, Idem, Ibid and Trad
Wrote much that is morally bad.
Some ballads, some chanties,
All poems on panties,
And limericks too, one must add.


If it's not either of them, is the poet mostly known for weighty poems? this one or weightless ones?, but he wrote a few of these also or both?
Rabrab (Rabrab)
New member
Username: Rabrab

Post Number: 1594
Registered: 2-2005
Posted on Friday, August 24, 2007 - 5:31 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ah.

English poet? Irish? Scots? American? German? French? Classical?

The golden hair that Galla wears
Is hers - who would have thought it?
She swears 'tis hers, and true she swears,
For I know where she bought it.

Martial
Suido (Suido)
New member
Username: Suido

Post Number: 64
Registered: 8-2007
Posted on Friday, August 24, 2007 - 10:12 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

k scuse i, the gormless engineering student who loves literature, but hasn't pursued it past high school. What's a weightless poem, as opposed to a weighty poem? is the weight of a poem directly relative to its importance in the annals of poetry or profoundness?

Australian poet? (figured i should probably ask something that may be helpful)

Fish

Wet Pet
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 68
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Friday, August 24, 2007 - 11:00 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Rabrab

English poet? this one Irish? Scots? American? German? French? Classical?

Suido

What's a weightless poem, as opposed to a weighty poem? is the weight of a poem directly relative to its importance in the annals of poetry or profoundness? indeed - an excellent summary of the position

Australian poet? no
Crazypalpig (Crazypalpig)
New member
Username: Crazypalpig

Post Number: 1414
Registered: 8-2006
Posted on Friday, August 24, 2007 - 12:20 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I feel this will be hard:
and I am not a bard
so please pass this by,
like a harmless butterfly

Did that make any sense?

Is the poet well known? was his first name Will?
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 69
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Friday, August 24, 2007 - 12:44 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I feel this will be hard:
and I am not a bard
so please pass this by,
like a harmless butterfly.

Did that make any sense? about as much sense as a sign saying "Ignore This Sign". But bonus marks anyway for a fine contribution to the LTPF Weightless Poetry Museum's collection.


Is the poet well known? not as well known as a poet whose first name was Will was his first name Will? no
Booklover (Booklover)
New member
Username: Booklover

Post Number: 615
Registered: 4-2007
Posted on Friday, August 24, 2007 - 2:53 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

hmmm... did this person write novels as well?

charles lutwidge dodgson (lewis carroll)?
t.s. eliot (though he was actually american)?

i don't know what to write--
or the correct questions to ask.
everything I say seems so trite
on this lateral puzzle task!
Beccaann (Beccaann)
New member
Username: Beccaann

Post Number: 1569
Registered: 6-2006
Posted on Friday, August 24, 2007 - 3:37 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ah yes, Lewis Carroll also came to me
I once had to memorize Jabberwocky
But my favorite line
Was the Snark-hunting kind
For the snark was a Boojum, you see.
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 70
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Friday, August 24, 2007 - 3:49 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

hmmm... did this person write novels as well? yes

charles lutwidge dodgson (lewis carroll)? no
t.s. eliot (though he was actually american)? not Eliot, but this author did spend some considerable time in America

i don't know what to write--
or the correct questions to ask.
everything I say seems so trite
on this lateral puzzle task!

Do not despair, O bibliophile -
It isn't such a hopeless case.
Progress is made in plodding style,
And slow but steady wins the race.
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 71
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Friday, August 24, 2007 - 4:04 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ah yes, Lewis Carroll also came to me
I once had to memorize Jabberwocky
But my favorite line
Was the Snark-hunting kind
For the snark was a Boojum, you see.

Then, in respect of the author in this puzzle:

You may seek him with thimbles, and seek him with care,
Pursue him with forks and hope,
But do not give up and start tearing your hair -
There's no need for that. You can cope.
Crazypalpig (Crazypalpig)
New member
Username: Crazypalpig

Post Number: 1415
Registered: 8-2006
Posted on Friday, August 24, 2007 - 4:18 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I can't think of anymore poets, so...

Is the title relevant at all?

Booklover, I feel the same
and I think this puzzle is to blame
it's too confusing of right now
Really Hope it gets clearer somehow!
Beccaann (Beccaann)
New member
Username: Beccaann

Post Number: 1570
Registered: 6-2006
Posted on Friday, August 24, 2007 - 4:39 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

So is this poet/novelist more well known for his poetry? or for his novels?
Rabrab (Rabrab)
New member
Username: Rabrab

Post Number: 1597
Registered: 2-2005
Posted on Friday, August 24, 2007 - 10:05 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Flibberty-gibberty
Woubit (that's David Burn,)
sets puzzles so fiendish
his solvers despair.

Answering questions, he's
veteratorian;
"Sufficient Vague Values"...
and we tear our hair.


More on our mysterious poet:
What century did he live in? before the 17th? 17th? 18th? 19th? 20th? 21st?
Haenlomal (Haenlomal)
New member
Username: Haenlomal

Post Number: 848
Registered: 9-2003
Posted on Friday, August 24, 2007 - 10:14 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Wild guess time!

Shakespeare?
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 72
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Friday, August 24, 2007 - 11:58 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Crazypalpig

I can't think of anymore poets, so...

Is the title relevant at all? the significance of the title has been thoroughly explored - its only purpose was to turn your minds in the direction of poetry

Booklover, I feel the same
and I think this puzzle is to blame
it's too confusing of right now
Really Hope it gets clearer somehow!

Fear not, O crazy porcine friend,
You're bound to get there in the end.
A hint might help: perhaps you should
Forget the trees, and seek the wood.


Beccaann

So is this poet/novelist more well known for his poetry? this one or for his novels?

Rabrab

Flibberty-gibberty
Woubit (that's David Burn,)
sets puzzles so fiendish
his solvers despair.

Answering questions, he's
veteratorian;
"Sufficient Vague Values"...
and we tear our hair.

Barbara Bailey has
hit on a metre that
makes composition much
harder to do.
Concentrate hard on this
sesquipedalian
verse form - you'll find there a
palpable clue.


More on our mysterious poet:
What century did he live in? before the 17th? 17th? 18th? 19th? 20th? this one 21st?

Haenlomal

Wild guess time!

Shakespeare? I fear not
Booklover (Booklover)
New member
Username: Booklover

Post Number: 619
Registered: 4-2007
Posted on Saturday, August 25, 2007 - 12:37 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

hmmm...Everyone I think of is either American-born or English (but born before the 20th century).

don't know if anyone has asked, but is the poet a man or a woman?

could it be kipling? (though he is probably more famous for his novels, I would think...)
wordsworth--woodsworth? : )

would it be considered cheating to skim through some of my books of poetry???

that's it for me...
I'd better skittledeedee
and dash off to
think of more ? for you!
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 73
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Saturday, August 25, 2007 - 12:51 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

hmmm...Everyone I think of is either American-born or English (but born before the 20th century).

don't know if anyone has asked, but is the poet a man this one or a woman?

could it be kipling? it could, in an alternative universe, but not in this one (though he is probably more famous for his novels, I would think...)
wordsworth--woodsworth? : ) no, but good thinking

would it be considered cheating to skim through some of my books of poetry??? certainly not - reference aids may be used freely on all woubit puzzles
Rabrab (Rabrab)
New member
Username: Rabrab

Post Number: 1598
Registered: 2-2005
Posted on Saturday, August 25, 2007 - 2:59 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Well, let's see,

It called a double dactyl;
It's really difficult to make one scan properly;
It's even more difficult to write one that's weighty.
The dactylic foot is LA-da-da;


Is the poem we're in search of a double dactyl itself?

Has the poet? (or the poem?) been the subject of a noted double dactyl?
Booklover (Booklover)
New member
Username: Booklover

Post Number: 621
Registered: 4-2007
Posted on Saturday, August 25, 2007 - 3:56 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

alfred noyes? he wrote "the highwayman"one of my favorite poems
or....
william watson?
edgar a. guest?
Sixtyeight (Sixtyeight)
New member
Username: Sixtyeight

Post Number: 451
Registered: 6-2007
Posted on Saturday, August 25, 2007 - 5:27 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

D. H. Lawrence?
pre - British revival?
Suido (Suido)
New member
Username: Suido

Post Number: 71
Registered: 8-2007
Posted on Saturday, August 25, 2007 - 8:06 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

we're told to seek the wood,
and forget about trees,
he gives out some clues
but they're only to tease.

the puzzle is 'overweight', and i understand we must find a poem that is weightless, yet overweight in one aspect?
since we're seeking a specific poem, are you saying we should concentrate on genres and styles rather than poets and poems?
is the poet most well known for composing poems that are...
narrative?
lyric?
prose?
satyrical?
humourous?
tragic?

and to throw a couple of WAGs on the end of this, Spike Milligan? Roald Dahl?
alas i just found the part where you said he is more well known for his poetry than his novels

Over this puzzle, i do curse
the challenge of finding a single verse.
Simpler it is, to rhyme with woubit,
that i can do, indubit
ably.

apologies if i mispronounced woubit, but i claim a weightless poetical license. Never mind about the fifth line shenanigans.
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 74
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Saturday, August 25, 2007 - 9:54 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Rabrab

Well, let's see,

It's called a double dactyl;
It's really difficult to make one scan properly;
It's even more difficult to write one that's weighty.
The dactylic foot is LA-da-da; indeed. The double dactyl, or "higgledy-piggledy", was created by the American poets Anthony Hecht, Paul Pascal and John Hollander in the 1950s (Pascal was Swiss by birth). Strictly, a double dactyl should: begin with a nonsense phrase; be biographical; and contain (at least) one line consisting of a single word. The form is not designed for weighty poetry, although it may of course deal with serious matters:

Higgledy piggledy
Jesus of Nazareth,
Faced with the task of the
Saving of Man,
Gazed at the world with a
Teleological
Sigh, and said "Father, I'll
Do what I can."


Is the poem we're in search of a double dactyl itself? not the poem...

Has the poet? (or the poem?) been the subject of a noted double dactyl? not as far as I know

Booklover

alfred noyes? he wrote "the highwayman"one of my favorite poems
or....
william watson?
edgar a. guest? none of these, but bonus marks for good taste

Sixtyeight

D. H. Lawrence? no, but good thinking

pre - British revival? I am not sure in what era you consider the "British revival" to have taken place. British poetry has not, as far as I am aware, ever needed reviving - since the time of Langland, it has been in excellent health.

A bunch of long-haired layabouts created something called the "British Modern Revival" in the late 1960s, but apart from one or two reasonable poems by Roy Fisher and Christopher Logue, this produced nothing of lasting merit. The author of the poem that is the subject of this puzzle would not have been seen dead in the British Modern Revival.


Suido

we're told to seek the wood,
and forget about trees,
he gives out some clues
but they're only to tease.

I have no desire to tease -
My clues are intended to ease
Your search for the wood.
It would also be good
If before that, you managed to sneeze.


the puzzle is 'overweight', and i understand we must find a poem that is weightless, yet overweight in one aspect? exactly so

since we're seeking a specific poem, are you saying we should concentrate on genres and styles rather than poets and poems? any approach may help - one can never tell

is the poet most well known for composing poems that are...
narrative?
lyric?
prose?
satyrical?
humourous?
tragic? he has composed poems in all of these categories

and to throw a couple of WAGs on the end of this, Spike Milligan? Roald Dahl? but he was not either of these poets

alas i just found the part where you said he is more well known for his poetry than his novels

Over this puzzle, i do curse
the challenge of finding a single verse.
Simpler it is, to rhyme with woubit,
that i can do, indubit
ably.

apologies if i mispronounced woubit, but i claim a weightless poetical license. Never mind about the fifth line shenanigans. I don't mind in the least. "woubit" is indeed pronounced as you surmise, and bonus marks for a most ingenious rhyme.
Sixtyeight (Sixtyeight)
New member
Username: Sixtyeight

Post Number: 452
Registered: 6-2007
Posted on Saturday, August 25, 2007 - 1:33 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Search for the wood.... is he George Barker?
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 75
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Saturday, August 25, 2007 - 1:52 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Search for the wood.... is he George Barker? no, but bonus marks for even having heard of George Barker
Suido (Suido)
New member
Username: Suido

Post Number: 77
Registered: 8-2007
Posted on Saturday, August 25, 2007 - 2:28 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

After series of achoo's
reminiscent of bad 'flu's,
a name came to me,
as plain as could be:
Poet laureate Ted Hughes?

Blistering barnacle,
six-six-six-four times two:
the syllabic meter
gives us a clue?
Or did Nameless Poet
devise double dactyls
incriminatingly?
Tell me it's true.
Rabrab (Rabrab)
New member
Username: Rabrab

Post Number: 1599
Registered: 2-2005
Posted on Saturday, August 25, 2007 - 2:57 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)


quote:

Is the poem we're in search of a double dactyl itself? not the poem...


Is the man's name a double dactyl?
a dactyl?
Gilbert Keith Chesterton?
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 76
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Saturday, August 25, 2007 - 5:21 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Suido

After series of achoo's
reminiscent of bad 'flu's,
a name came to me,
as plain as could be:
Poet laureate Ted Hughes? no, but here is some weightless poetry about Ted Hughes, who once remarked that "the progress of any writer is marked by those moments when he manages to outwit his own inner police system". To the tune of "A Policeman's Lot" by Arthur Sullivan:

I once was a policeman young and merry,
Controlling crowds and fighting petty crime,
But I'm now engaged on matters literary,
And I am growing old before my time.
For the imagination of a writer
Is not the kind of beat a chap would choose,
And they've assigned me a prolific blighter -
I'm patrolling the subconscious of Ted Hughes.

It's not the kind of beat a chap would choose,
Patrolling the subconscious of Ted Hughes.

All our leave was cancelled in the lambing season
When bitter winter froze the drinking trough,
For as our commander stated with good reason,
That's just the kind of thing that starts him off.
But anything with four legs causes trouble,
It's worse than organising several zoos -
Not to mention mythic creatures in the rubble -
Patrolling the subconscious of Ted Hughes.

It's worse than organising several zoos,
Patrolling the subconscious of Ted Hughes.

Now although it's disagreeable and stressful
Attempting to arrest poetic thought,
I could boast of times when I have been successful,
And conspiring compound epithets were caught.
But the poetry statistics in this sector
Are enough to make a copper turn to booze,
And I don't think I shall make it to Inspector
Patrolling the subconscious of Ted Hughes.

It's enough to make a copper turn to booze,
Patrolling the subconscious of Ted Hughes.


Wendy Cope


Blistering barnacle,
six-six-six-four times two:
the syllabic meter
gives us a clue?
Or did Nameless Poet
devise double dactyls
incriminatingly?
Tell me it's true.

Higgledy piggledy
Suido the Lateral
guessed at a poet who
might fit the bill.
Hughes and our hero were
contemporaneous,
but the unknown is
anonymous still.


Rabrab

Is the man's name a double dactyl? yes
a dactyl? well, his first name is a dactyl, and so is his surname
Gilbert Keith Chesterton? no, but bonus marks for mentioning another of the puzzle setter's favourite poets.
Booklover (Booklover)
New member
Username: Booklover

Post Number: 622
Registered: 4-2007
Posted on Saturday, August 25, 2007 - 6:32 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I was hoping the poet was ted hughes--
though I've read nothing of his, alas.
some of his poetry I need to peruse...
I've heard he was such a gas!
Rabrab (Rabrab)
New member
Username: Rabrab

Post Number: 1600
Registered: 2-2005
Posted on Saturday, August 25, 2007 - 8:01 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Fol de la, Fol de la
Siegfried Lorraine Sassoon
Lots of his poems are
gloomy and dark.

He may have written some
agravitational
verses; I can't find them.
...I'm off to the park.
Suido (Suido)
New member
Username: Suido

Post Number: 80
Registered: 8-2007
Posted on Saturday, August 25, 2007 - 9:31 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My knowledge of English poets is done.
Adding those dactylic limitations
reduces my ideas to, well, none.
It's time for some new inspirations!
I'll not find the answers in poetry,
There is another route I can explore:
Novels and prose are more my cup of tea,
From this field I hope to learn somewhat more.
Did he write essays, or tomes bombastic?
Record historic facts, or tell tall tales?
Fiction? Sci-fi, of things quite fantastic?
Or things mundane, like doco's on snails?
I'll list them all below, plus some extra.
Oh dear, no rhyme! Quick, insert fenestra.

So, did he write any weighty or famous...
essays?
short stories?
novellas?
novels?
scripts? for television? radio? stage? movie?
comedy?
tragedy?
crime?
non-fiction?
sci-fi?
fantasy?
reviews? critiques?
letters?
diaries?

Booklover, that was terribly rude.
I thought this a thread of wit and rhyme
When you say something so awfully crude,
Just as we were oven such a good time.

;-)
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 77
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Saturday, August 25, 2007 - 9:41 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Booklover

I was hoping the poet was ted hughes--
though I've read nothing of his, alas.
some of his poetry I need to peruse...
I've heard he was such a gas!

For years a secret shame destroyed my peace -
I'd not read Eliot, Auden or Macneice.
But now I think a thought that brings me hope:
Neither had Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Pope.


Rabrab

Fol de la, Fol de la
Siegfried Lorraine Sassoon
Lots of his poems are
gloomy and dark.

He may have written some
agravitational
verses; I can't find them.
...I'm off to the park.

Higgledy piggledy
Siegfried Sassoon, though he
isn't the man you are
seeking, alas,
does have a name with some
memorability -
must have been close between
that and Alsace.
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 78
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Saturday, August 25, 2007 - 9:59 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

So, did he write any weighty or famous...

I should say here that although I have described this author as "reasonably well known", his reputation is not that of a Shakespeare or a Dickens. To recap what you have discovered: he was an Englishman by birth who lived during the twentieth century and spent some considerable time in the United States - I will give you the further information that he became an American citizen and lived in that country for the second half of his life.

A few of his works achieved world-wide fame in one way or another, though it is entirely possible that you have heard of the work without knowing the identity of its author. Most of his work, though, is not known at all to the general public - but here in the LTPF, we are not the general public. The description "famous" should be taken in that context.


essays? yes
short stories? yes
novellas? yes
novels? yes
scripts? for television? radio? stage? movie? he certainly wrote some plays and some screenplays; I do not know whether he wrote for television or radio
comedy? yes
tragedy? yes
crime? not as far as I am aware
non-fiction? yes
sci-fi? not as far as I am aware
fantasy? yes, for svv of "fantasy"
reviews? critiques? yes
letters? yes
diaries? yes
Beccaann (Beccaann)
New member
Username: Beccaann

Post Number: 1576
Registered: 6-2006
Posted on Saturday, August 25, 2007 - 10:24 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Higgledy piggledy
Sherlock and Watson had
never a mystery
tougher than this.

So many poets are
eliminatable;
I can't find one, though, that
I can't dismiss.
Rabrab (Rabrab)
New member
Username: Rabrab

Post Number: 1602
Registered: 2-2005
Posted on Saturday, August 25, 2007 - 10:37 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Harking back to Sixty-eight,
on August twenty-third,
He asked if "red" was aught we sought;
You said 'twas not absurd.

So is it "Red" as in "red scare"
Or "Commie Pinko Freak"?
Was he a spendthrift, in the red?
A rake, red lights to seek?

"Red tape," "Red dwarf" or "Thin red line"
a clerk, stargazer, soldier-man
Each indicate in turn.
(I'm flailing here; I have no plan.)

Another color matters, too,
At least you so told Lynne.
Is that one blue, or leafy green?
Or silver, the color of tin?

Yellow, tan or burnt sienna?
Orange, ochre, purple?
Indigo, violet, black, or pink?
Or brown, like maple surple?

Bet you wondered how I was going to rhyme purple, didn't you? I stole it from Roger Miller.
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 79
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Saturday, August 25, 2007 - 11:02 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Harking back to Sixty-eight,
on August twenty-third,
He asked if "red" was aught we sought;
You said 'twas not absurd.

So is it "Red" as in "red scare"
Or "Commie Pinko Freak"?
Was he a spendthrift, in the red?
A rake, red lights to seek?

"Red tape," "Red dwarf" or "Thin red line"
a clerk, stargazer, soldier-man
Each indicate in turn.
(I'm flailing here; I have no plan.)

An editor will oft employ
a commonplace utensil
to strike a word that might annoy -
his trusty bright red pencil.


Another color matters, too,
At least you so told Lynne.
Is that one blue, or leafy green?
Or silver, the color of tin?

The heralds call it azure, but
the likes of me and you,
in contexts where we talk of smut,
refer to it as blue.


Yellow, tan or burnt sienna?
Orange, ochre, purple?
Indigo, violet, black, or pink?
Or brown, like maple surple?

I should like to record here my admiration for the considerable poetic talent displayed by everyone who has taken part in this silly puzzle. It is good to know that weightless verse is alive and well and living in the Lateral Thinking Puzzles Forum.
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 80
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Saturday, August 25, 2007 - 11:14 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Higgledy piggledy
Sherlock and Watson had
never a mystery
tougher than this.

So many poets are
eliminatable;
I can't find one, though, that
I can't dismiss.

Bakery cakery
"Watson", said Sherlock, "just
how many times have I
mentioned to you:
once you eliminate
impossibilities,
that which remains must be
utterly true?"
Booklover (Booklover)
New member
Username: Booklover

Post Number: 623
Registered: 4-2007
Posted on Saturday, August 25, 2007 - 11:57 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

i just couldn't figure it
so i cheated a bit
and googled a lit-
tle
before i give a guess
put my mind at rest
at let me know if it is all right
to share what i found tonight...
i don't usually like to google on the ltpf, but I couldn't figure this one out! i don't want to make anyone who is working on this upset--let me know if I should give a guess here, or email you my guess....
Beccaann (Beccaann)
New member
Username: Beccaann

Post Number: 1577
Registered: 6-2006
Posted on Sunday, August 26, 2007 - 12:06 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Goodness gracious,
I've Googled galore!
And to no avail,
I can Google no more!

If you think you've an answer,
By me it's all right
If you share it,
or I'll have to Google all night.

I wonder if I,
in my Googling quest
Came upon the answer,
But my brain needed rest

and I skimmed it right over
if so, woe is me
'Cause this mystery poet
Is BAFFLING ME!!!!
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 81
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Sunday, August 26, 2007 - 12:20 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

i don't usually like to google on the ltpf, but I couldn't figure this one out! i don't want to make anyone who is working on this upset--let me know if I should give a guess here, or email you my guess....

My apologies for having occasioned any over-exertion. As I've said, reference aids (including Google) may freely be used in all woubit puzzles, and results freely shared. If Booklover has a guess, let her by all means post it here.
Booklover (Booklover)
New member
Username: Booklover

Post Number: 624
Registered: 4-2007
Posted on Sunday, August 26, 2007 - 12:20 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

i'll put my guess in white (but I did just realize that I don't think this man did any poetry! and now I'm not sure his name is a double-dactyl....hmmm....maybe I'll google some more, but I'm going out for a bit)...ok my guess is gavin lambert--born england, moved hollywood--he did do novels, screenplays etc--and he is writing a novel on Natalie Wood.looking at woods instead of trees!back to the drawing board! need to give my brain a rest--I'm with Beccaann--I keep dismissing people instead of coming up with them!
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 82
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Sunday, August 26, 2007 - 12:28 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

back to the drawing board! need to give my brain a rest--I'm with Beccaann--I keep dismissing people instead of coming up with them!

The author you seek has a great deal in common with the author at whom you have guessed. He was born in England and moved to Hollywood, and although he did not write very much poetry, he had a close lifelong association with one of the greatest poets of the twentieth century. Moreover, his name is a true double dactyl.
Beccaann (Beccaann)
New member
Username: Beccaann

Post Number: 1578
Registered: 6-2006
Posted on Sunday, August 26, 2007 - 1:38 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ok, here's another angle:

Are any of these the first name of our poet?

Timothy?
Samuel?
Theodore?
Abraham?
Adrian?
Avery?
Benjamin?
Cameron?
Christopher?
Elliott?
Jeremy?
Jonathan?
Joshua?
Nicholas?
Anthony?
Damien?
Dominic?
Frederick?
Gregory?
Madison?
Mario?
Oliver?
William?
Gabriel?
Raphael?
Reginald?
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 83
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Sunday, August 26, 2007 - 1:41 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Are any of these the first name of our poet?

Timothy?
Samuel?
Theodore?
Abraham?
Adrian?
Avery?
Benjamin?
Cameron?
Christopher? this one - good angle
Elliott?
Jeremy?
Jonathan?
Joshua?
Nicholas?
Anthony?
Damien?
Dominic?
Frederick?
Gregory?
Madison?
Mario?
Oliver?
William?
Gabriel?
Raphael?
Reginald?
Beccaann (Beccaann)
New member
Username: Beccaann

Post Number: 1579
Registered: 6-2006
Posted on Sunday, August 26, 2007 - 1:53 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Christopher Isherwood?
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 84
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Sunday, August 26, 2007 - 1:58 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Christopher Isherwood? exactly and precisely so - well done
Blazingphoenix (Blazingphoenix)
New member
Username: Blazingphoenix

Post Number: 147
Registered: 2-2007
Posted on Sunday, August 26, 2007 - 2:07 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Woubit you meanie,
Your puzzle's too hard!
I've been trying to solve,
but my brain feels like lard!
;^D

Drat... I was thinking along the lines of Robert Frost, although I don't think he did anything weightless... I still don't think I understand the meaning of weightless poetry. You said "looking at wood instead of the trees", so I thought maybe it was him because of His two famous poems, "Stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Evening", and "The Road Not Taken". Well shoot!

Well, now that we know his first (and probably last) name, what else do we need to solve?
Rabrab (Rabrab)
New member
Username: Rabrab

Post Number: 1603
Registered: 2-2005
Posted on Sunday, August 26, 2007 - 3:26 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Now, I believe we need to find out the poem that Woubit has in mind, and then from there, I believe we need to figure out how a piece of weightless poetry can be overweight. Oh, and there's some sort of connection to the etymology of a word in there, too.
Crazypalpig (Crazypalpig)
New member
Username: Crazypalpig

Post Number: 1422
Registered: 8-2006
Posted on Sunday, August 26, 2007 - 11:58 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Darn. Leave for 2 days, and the puzzle jumped 30 posts!
When I was young and wanted to see the sights,
They told me: 'Cast an eye over the Roman Camp
If you care to.
But plan to spend most of your day at the Aquarium -
Because, after all, the Aquarium -
Well, I mean to say, the Aquarium -
Till you've seen the Aquarium you ain't seen nothing.'

So I cast my eye over
The Roman Camp -
And that old Roman Camp,
That old, old Roman Camp
Got me
Interested.

So that now, near closing-time,
I find that I still know nothing -
And am still not even sorry that I know nothing -
About fish.

I found this thingy about Christopher's poetry...
Rabrab (Rabrab)
New member
Username: Rabrab

Post Number: 1605
Registered: 2-2005
Posted on Monday, August 27, 2007 - 5:04 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The common cormorant (or sha g)
Lays eggs inside a paper bag,
You follow the idea, no doubt?
It's to keep the lightning out.

But what these unobservant birds
Have never thought of, is that herds
Of wandering bears might come with buns
And steal the bags to hold the crumbs.


Hi Diddle Hey Diddle,
Christopher Isherwood
This is so odd that he
Couldn't be joking.

Musings so layered, such
metaphilosophy,
So much to think about;
I want what he's smoking.
Woubit (Woubit)
Moderator
Username: Woubit

Post Number: 85
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Monday, August 27, 2007 - 1:28 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

That will do admirably as a

*********** SPOILER ***********

In another puzzle on this forum, I read that cormorants were supposed to be highly intelligent birds because they could count to seven. I attempted to post a message to the effect that although the intelligence of cormorants was considerable, their powers of observation were somewhat limited - citing as a reference that well-known ornithologist Christopher Isherwood, whose treatise on the subject appears above in Rabrab's message.

Like Rabrab, however, I encountered a difficulty. Although "sh*g" is a perfectly innocent word in terms of being another name for the cormorant, it is not so regarded by the LTPF software, which replaces it with four blobs thus: . Thus the piece of weightless poetry I was attempting to quote turned out to be, at least as far as the LTPF Board of Censors is concerned, overweight.

Thanks to all who joined in this silly puzzle and contributed some fine specimens of weightless poetry.
Rabrab (Rabrab)
New member
Username: Rabrab

Post Number: 1606
Registered: 2-2005
Posted on Monday, August 27, 2007 - 2:19 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I must admit I was still miles away from putting together the fact that the LTPF editor didn't approve of "sha g" with your red pencil=editing / blue=smut clues. I was thinking more of a soi disant 'literary critic' of my acquaintance who would absolutely wet himself with excitement if he were given a chance to analyze "The Cormorant". To me, it's amusing, but arrant nonsense; to him, it would be fodder for at least a five-page paper.

Nonetheless, Bravo!! to Woubit for an excellent puzzle!
Bodo (Bodo)
New member
Username: Bodo

Post Number: 2033
Registered: 2-2001
Posted on Monday, August 27, 2007 - 3:22 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I was trying to use the word once in the context of picking up golf or tennis balls when I encountered that particular piece of censorship, and that was a few years back - I think it's Mike Myer's fault.
Peter365 (Peter365)
New member
Username: Peter365

Post Number: 632
Registered: 1-2007
Posted on Monday, August 27, 2007 - 10:59 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Woubit you're a great puzzler indeed,
As many I'm sure have agreed,
Even though I wasn't playing,
I can't keep from saying,
This puzzle was a cracking good read.
Lynne (Lynne)
New member
Username: Lynne

Post Number: 3314
Registered: 12-2000
Posted on Saturday, September 01, 2007 - 10:55 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

lesbian
Lynne (Lynne)
New member
Username: Lynne

Post Number: 3315
Registered: 12-2000
Posted on Saturday, September 01, 2007 - 10:58 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Oops! - I hit the send button instead of cancel!

I better explain - The reason I put that there was that on Friends Reunited, at one point, that word was a forbidden word, and I was curious to see whether it was a red blob word here. Someone had used the word on FR just to explain the subject of her thesis. Go figure....
Mosquito (Mosquito)
New member
Username: Mosquito

Post Number: 425
Registered: 4-2005
Posted on Sunday, September 02, 2007 - 3:15 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Who is Mike Myer? Is he someone campaigning against obscenity on the internet?
Rabrab (Rabrab)
New member
Username: Rabrab

Post Number: 1609
Registered: 2-2005
Posted on Sunday, September 02, 2007 - 4:17 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

No, Mike Myers and the Austin Powers movies greatly increased the use of 'sha g' to mean 'have intercourse with'.
Mosquito (Mosquito)
New member
Username: Mosquito

Post Number: 427
Registered: 4-2005
Posted on Thursday, September 06, 2007 - 11:30 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Did they really? I have heard of the movie, but have not noticed any difference in usage. Not in London, anyway.

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action: