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Woubit (Woubit)
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Post Number: 963
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Saturday, January 23, 2010 - 5:43 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

A man shot himself upon seeing a review.
Galfisk (Galfisk)
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Post Number: 1217
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Posted on Saturday, January 23, 2010 - 11:48 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Did he shoot himself to death? Did he intend to kill himself? Did he shoot himself with a firearm? Is he H/A/M? Did this happen in modern times? Relevant where? Egypt relevant? Egyptians? Hobbling? Did he shoot himself in the foot? Because the review said his boots were bulletproof?
Tanvishashikant (Tanvishashikant)
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Post Number: 190
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Posted on Saturday, January 23, 2010 - 7:04 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Did the man shoot himself with a camera?
Was the review that of a film? Book? Restaurant? Or of any thing else that's entertainment or leisure related?
Where did he see the review - on TV? In an AD? In a book? Newspaper? Magazine? Hoarding? Notice board?
Was he involved in any way in creating the subject/object that was reviewed?
Woubit (Woubit)
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Post Number: 964
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Sunday, January 24, 2010 - 10:03 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Did he shoot himself to death? yes Did he intend to kill himself? yes Did he shoot himself with a firearm? yes Is he H/A/M? well, he was Did this happen in modern times? yes Relevant where? yes Egypt relevant? no Egyptians? no Hobbling? no Did he shoot himself in the foot? no Because the review said his boots were bulletproof? no

Did the man shoot himself with a camera? no
Was the review that of a film? no Book? no Restaurant? no Or of any thing else that's entertainment or leisure related? yes
Where did he see the review - on TV? In an AD? this one In a book? Newspaper? Magazine? Hoarding? Notice board? this one
Was he involved in any way in creating the subject/object that was reviewed? no
Galfisk (Galfisk)
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Post Number: 1231
Registered: 9-2009
Posted on Sunday, January 24, 2010 - 1:59 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Relevant that he shot himself? Or only that he committed suicide? Did he kill himself because: he had done something bad? He had nothing to live for? Something bad would happen to him? Another good reason? A stupid reason?
Oisin (Oisin)
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Post Number: 255
Registered: 12-2008
Posted on Monday, January 25, 2010 - 10:12 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Was the review a positive review? negative? Did the man kill himself because of the critical judgment of the review? was the reason for the suicide directly linked to the subject of the review? or was there an aside in the review which triggered the suicide? and as this is a LTPF puzzle, did the reviewer mention as an aside on the review of, say, Coleridge's Rime of the Ancyent Marinere, that albatross tasted exactly like... oh, let's not go there. Did the man feel personally slighted because of the review? shamed? exposed as a fraud? financially ruined?
Was the suicide caused by the content of the review itself? or was the review a coded message of some sort?

The review: a theatre review? dance? opera? ballet? music? literary?
Did the man know the reviewer?
Woubit (Woubit)
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Post Number: 965
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Tuesday, January 26, 2010 - 12:10 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Relevant that he shot himself? no Or only that he committed suicide? yes Did he kill himself because: he had done something bad? no He had nothing to live for? yesish Something bad would happen to him? perhaps Another good reason? no A stupid reason? well, you might say so

Was the review a positive review? yes negative? laeftr Did the man kill himself because of the critical judgment of the review? no was the reason for the suicide directly linked to the subject of the review? no or was there an aside in the review which triggered the suicide? no and as this is a LTPF puzzle, did the reviewer mention as an aside on the review of, say, Coleridge's Rime of the Ancyent Marinere, that albatross tasted exactly like... oh, let's not go there. good idea Did the man feel personally slighted because of the review? no shamed? noish exposed as a fraud? no financially ruined? no
Was the suicide caused by the content of the review itself? yes or was the review a coded message of some sort? no

The review: a theatre review? this one dance? opera? ballet? music? literary?
Did the man know the reviewer? no
Torquemada (Torquemada)
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Post Number: 19
Registered: 1-2010
Posted on Tuesday, January 26, 2010 - 8:51 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Was the review of a theatrical production he was in? One he was involved in? Did he know people who were involved in it? If so, did he want them to do well?

Did he misunderstand the review? Was the headline misleading? Was a certain word/phrase used in the review ambiguous?
Rabrab (Rabrab)
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Post Number: 1666
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Posted on Tuesday, January 26, 2010 - 6:47 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

If he wasn't in the production, had he seen it?

Had he enjoyed it? Did he think it was a good production? Did he think it was as good as the reviewer did?
Oisin (Oisin)
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Post Number: 258
Registered: 12-2008
Posted on Tuesday, January 26, 2010 - 6:57 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The review: might any positive review of this production have triggered the suicide reaction? Or did this review mention a particular person, or comment on a particular aspect of the production, and this caused the suicide? Was there one particular sentence, or passage, that was the cause?

Yesish to 'nothing to live for': had he hoped to be the first to achieve something, and the review revealed that his hopes were thwarted? was he in love with someone, and that love would now be unrequited?
Woubit (Woubit)
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Post Number: 966
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Wednesday, January 27, 2010 - 1:32 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Was the review of a theatrical production he was in? no One he was involved in? no Did he know people who were involved in it? no If so, did he want them to do well?

Did he misunderstand the review? yes Was the headline misleading? to some extent Was a certain word/phrase used in the review ambiguous? yes, indeed

If he wasn't in the production, had he seen it? no

Had he enjoyed it? Did he think it was a good production? Did he think it was as good as the reviewer did? he had not seen the play in question, and had no reason to form an opinion about it one way or the other

The review: might any positive review of this production have triggered the suicide reaction? yes, and so might certain negative reviews Or did this review mention a particular person, or comment on a particular aspect of the production, and this caused the suicide? nothing like this Was there one particular sentence, or passage, that was the cause? well, the "review" was four words long, one of which was problematic

Yesish to 'nothing to live for': had he hoped to be the first to achieve something, not the first, but he had hoped to achieve something, and... and the review revealed that his hopes were thwarted? ...on seeing the review, he despaired of ever achieving that aim was he in love with someone, and that love would now be unrequited? nothing like this either
Peter365 (Peter365)
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Post Number: 2451
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Posted on Wednesday, January 27, 2010 - 10:15 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

By review do you mean this was a poster advertising a play with a soundbite from a review printed on it e.g "It's a must see"

Hmm How do I phrase this ...Was the review written in theatrical lovey type language?

Was he hoping to overcome any physical disability?
Torquemada (Torquemada)
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Post Number: 22
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Posted on Wednesday, January 27, 2010 - 11:47 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

So any positive review of the production, and even certain negative reviews, might have triggered his suicide? Is that because the relevant phrase isn't exclusively positive? Because other negative phrases could have a similar effect?

Was he attempting/hoping to overcome some form of disadvantage? Illness? To achieve something distinctive, e.g. swimming the channel? To improve himself in some other way? Did he take the review as referring to him in some way?

A long shot:
Was the relevant phrase something like "you won't see better", or "you won't get better", which convinced him that his health, currently poor, would remain that way?
Woubit (Woubit)
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Post Number: 967
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Wednesday, January 27, 2010 - 5:32 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

By review do you mean this was a poster advertising a play with a soundbite from a review printed on it e.g "It's a must see" something of that sort, yes

Hmm How do I phrase this ...Was the review written in theatrical lovey type language? no

Was he hoping to overcome any physical disability? no

So any positive review of the production, and even certain negative reviews, might have triggered his suicide? yes Is that because the relevant phrase isn't exclusively positive? the relevant phrase was on this occasion positive, but a negative version was also possible Because other negative phrases could have a similar effect? yes

Was he attempting/hoping to overcome some form of disadvantage? yesish Illness? no To achieve something distinctive, e.g. swimming the channel? not really, no To improve himself in some other way? yes Did he take the review as referring to him in some way? no

A long shot:
Was the relevant phrase something like "you won't see better", or "you won't get better", which convinced him that his health, currently poor, would remain that way? no, but a fine piece of thinking
Torquemada (Torquemada)
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Post Number: 32
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Posted on Thursday, January 28, 2010 - 10:15 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Was the location in [LTPF list of continents]? Was the review in English? Did he speak the language it was in?

Was he trying to learn a new skill? Pass an exam?
Galfisk (Galfisk)
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Post Number: 1241
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Posted on Thursday, January 28, 2010 - 10:52 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Was he trying to be the first at something? Best at something? Only one in the world at something? And thought someone had beat him to it?
Woubit (Woubit)
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Post Number: 968
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Posted on Thursday, January 28, 2010 - 11:33 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Was the location in [LTPF list of continents]? in Europe, or - to save any further debate - in England Was the review in English? yes Did he speak the language it was in? to some extent - good question

Was he trying to learn a new skill? yes Pass an exam? no

Was he trying to be the first at something? Best at something? Only one in the world at something? And thought someone had beat him to it? not quite like this
Oisin (Oisin)
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Post Number: 259
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Posted on Friday, January 29, 2010 - 8:50 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Would it help to establish the production being reviewed? Was it a play? a pantomime? a musical? Did the review mention the name of the production? of the director? author? one of the cast? of a theatre zone (West End? Broadway?)

Are false friends (faux amis) relevant? Did he mistake an English word for a similar one in his own native tongue? If so (or if otherwise relevant), did he speak [LTPF list of languages]?
Woubit (Woubit)
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Post Number: 969
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Posted on Friday, January 29, 2010 - 7:28 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Would it help to establish the production being reviewed? no Was it a play? this one a pantomime? a musical? Did the review mention the name of the production? yes of the director? author? one of the cast? of a theatre zone (West End? Broadway?) none of these

Are false friends (faux amis) relevant? no Did he mistake an English word for a similar one in his own native tongue? no If so (or if otherwise relevant), did he speak [LTPF list of languages]? it is said that he spoke Portuguese, having come from Brazil, but this is not especially relevant - he could as well have spoken Klingon
Oisin (Oisin)
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Post Number: 262
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Posted on Saturday, January 30, 2010 - 12:32 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Four words: is this linked to the four word constraint of, for example, the four word film review? or the New York Times artsbeat four word reviews? So are the four words a coherent phrase or sentence, or a set of linked words. Is one of the words a neologism? Did the suicide despair of ever learning English?
Jenburdoo (Jenburdoo)
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Posted on Tuesday, February 02, 2010 - 11:19 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Was it a Shakespeare play? Relevant what specific play it was? What specific type (comedy, tragedy, etc)?

Let's establish this -- he was in no way involved with the production that was reviewed. Correct?
Woubit (Woubit)
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Post Number: 970
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Posted on Wednesday, February 17, 2010 - 2:50 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Four words: is this linked to the four word constraint of, for example, the four word film review? or the New York Times artsbeat four word reviews? not this kind of thing So are the four words a coherent phrase or sentence, yes, I would say so or a set of linked words. Is one of the words a neologism? no Did the suicide despair of ever learning English? yes, and now we're cooking with gas...

Was it a Shakespeare play? as it happens, no, but... Relevant what specific play it was? ...it could have been anything What specific type (comedy, tragedy, etc)?

Let's establish this -- he was in no way involved with the production that was reviewed. Correct? Correct, and apologies for neglecting this puzzle.
Jenburdoo (Jenburdoo)
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Posted on Wednesday, February 17, 2010 - 5:05 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Could the review be considered pithy?

Did he misinterpret the review? Was he cured of a scrund? Did he think he was cured of a scrund? Did he have a scrund? Did he know it was directed at the play? Did he think it was directed at him?

It wasn't a Shakespeare play, but... does it involve Shakespeare? Directly, indirectly, tangentially? Is it by one of his contemporaries (Marlowe, for instance)? Is the man who shot himself a contemporary of Shakespeare? LTPF list of centuries in which this took place, if relevant. Also countries.

"he could as well have spoken Klingon" -- does this mean the Klingon version of Hamlet would work as the play in question? Does our protagonist have to be human? Is he killing himself for honor?
Torquemada (Torquemada)
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Posted on Wednesday, February 17, 2010 - 9:18 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is the review ambiguous? Could it be considered bad English? Is a pun involved? Multiple meanings of the same word? Is the precise text of the review relevant? Could the relevant feature of the review potentially appear in any review? Would this puzzle work if he was English, and the review was in Portuguese? Another language? Is the effect specific to English?

Is the title of the puzzle relevant?
Woubit (Woubit)
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Post Number: 972
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Posted on Sunday, February 21, 2010 - 6:15 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Could the review be considered pithy? terse, at any rate

Did he misinterpret the review? yes Was he cured of a scrund? as I understand the term, no - rather, he suffered from a scrund Did he think he was cured of a scrund? no Did he have a scrund? after he read the review, yes Did he know it was directed at the play? no - good question Did he think it was directed at him? no

It wasn't a Shakespeare play, but... does it involve Shakespeare? Directly, indirectly, tangentially? Is it by one of his contemporaries (Marlowe, for instance)? Is the man who shot himself a contemporary of Shakespeare? LTPF list of centuries in which this took place, if relevant. Also countries. the identity and authorship of the play are completely irrelevant. But to satisfy the curious, the play was written in 1892 by a man who, though his career paralleled in many respects that of William Shakespeare, did not write so well.

"he could as well have spoken Klingon" -- does this mean the Klingon version of Hamlet would work as the play in question? it would, in a somewhat unlikely set of circumstances Does our protagonist have to be human? no - he could have been a Martian Is he killing himself for honor? not really
Woubit (Woubit)
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Post Number: 973
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Posted on Sunday, February 21, 2010 - 6:21 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is the review ambiguous? yes Could it be considered bad English? no Is a pun involved? no, but... Multiple meanings of the same word? ...yes - good question Is the precise text of the review relevant? very much so Could the relevant feature of the review potentially appear in any review? yes Would this puzzle work if he was English, and the review was in Portuguese? no Another language? no, though I may be going out on a limb here - I speak about four languages passably, and the puzzle would not work in any of them, but it may work in some other language that I do not know Is the effect specific to English? as far as I know, yes, but see above

Is the title of the puzzle relevant? not in the least
Torquemada (Torquemada)
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Posted on Monday, February 22, 2010 - 9:17 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

So he sees the review, struggles to understand it thanks to the ambiguity of the review, multiple uses of the same word, and the general weirdness of the English language, despairs of ever understanding English and shoots himself?

Does the review consist of 2 different meanings of a word? 3? 4? Could the same effect be caused by a review of something other than a play? Something other than a review?

Does it involve multiple meanings of star? Play? Act? Is the word used as a noun? verb? adjective?
Woubit (Woubit)
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Post Number: 974
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Posted on Wednesday, February 24, 2010 - 2:29 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

So he sees the review, struggles to understand it thanks to the ambiguity of the review, multiple uses of the same word, and the general weirdness of the English language, despairs of ever understanding English and shoots himself? more or less, yes

Does the review consist of 2 different meanings of a word? this one 3? 4? Could the same effect be caused by a review of something other than a play? yes Something other than a review? no

Does it involve multiple meanings of star? Play? Act? none of those Is the word used as a noun? no verb? yes adjective? yes
Oisin (Oisin)
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Posted on Thursday, February 25, 2010 - 9:55 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The key word has two relevant meanings, one an adjective and one a verb? Is the intended meaning the adjective? Is this an -ing word?

The other three words in the review: do they contain one noun? two nouns? copula? a different verb? an adjective? adverb? the definite (or indefinite) article?
Woubit (Woubit)
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Post Number: 975
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Posted on Friday, February 26, 2010 - 3:37 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The key word has two relevant meanings, one an adjective and one a verb? yes Is the intended meaning the adjective? yes Is this an -ing word? no - it is, as most words that are at once adjectives and verbs, an -ed word

The other three words in the review: do they contain one noun? yes two nouns? yes, and if you keep going, you will discover that they also contain three nouns. Sometimes I miss Buzzard. copula? no, but bonus marks for gratuitous ostentation, otherwise known as showing off a different verb? no an adjective? adverb? the definite (or indefinite) article? none of these
Oisin (Oisin)
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Post Number: 270
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Posted on Saturday, February 27, 2010 - 7:57 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

A review consisting of three nouns and an adjective, misread as three nouns and a verb, prompts the suicide. The play itself is irrelevant - does this mean that the review does not contain any words from the title of the play? Do any of the nouns refer to characters in the play? to the names of the actors? the director?
Are any of the three nouns proper names? If so 1? 2? 3? (and I apologise if this line of questioning makes you yearn more for the return of Buzzard)
Any possessive nouns? pronouns?

Did the mistaken reading of the phrase make sense? Did our victim think he had understood the phrase, but was appalled at the meaning?
Woubit (Woubit)
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Posted on Sunday, February 28, 2010 - 1:12 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

A review consisting of three nouns and an adjective, misread as three nouns and a verb, prompts the suicide. indeed The play itself is irrelevant - does this mean that the review does not contain any words from the title of the play? not in the least - the review contains the title of the play in its entirety, accounting for two of the four words Do any of the nouns refer to characters in the play? those two words refer to a character who does not in fact appear at all in the play, but... to the names of the actors? the director?
Are any of the three nouns proper names? If so 1? 2? 3? (and I apologise if this line of questioning makes you yearn more for the return of Buzzard) well, the play was called Charley's Aunt, and this phrase formed the first two words of the review in question. But the play could have been called Hamlet, or For Colored Girls Who've Considered Suicide When The Rainbow is Enough (apparently the title of a real play) and the effect would have been pretty much the same, though more understandable in the former case than the latter.

Any possessive nouns? pronouns? see above, but the rest of the review consisted of a noun and a word that, because it was a past participle, was interpreted by the suicide as a verb but intended by the reviewer as an adjective; the noun was the fourth word of the review and the ambiguous word was the third

Did the mistaken reading of the phrase make sense? yes Did our victim think he had understood the phrase, but was appalled at the meaning? exactly so
Kaygee (Kaygee)
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Posted on Sunday, February 28, 2010 - 6:03 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is the unfortunate chap named Charley? Did he think that something happened to his aunt? Or that his aunt did something wrong?
Woubit (Woubit)
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Post Number: 979
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Posted on Sunday, February 28, 2010 - 12:04 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is the unfortunate chap named Charley? Did he think that something happened to his aunt? Or that his aunt did something wrong? nothing like this - the puzzle would work whatever the play or the protagonist of this sad tale was called
Peter365 (Peter365)
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Posted on Friday, March 05, 2010 - 2:24 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

This is a very interesting puzzle.

Just to narrow down the many possibilities was the reviewer trying to convey his own enjoyment of the performance or the fact that it was very well received by the audience? Or both even (mind you he'd find it hard to do this in just 4 words)

And just to make sure I have this right
"Charley's Aunt .....ed (meant as adjective read as verb) noun"

I feel the noun has to have something one would associate with a play e.g performance, audiance, play, set etc. Am I right in this assumption?

Is the verb some synonym of liked or loved. e.g The review might have said "Charley's Aunt adored play" (I realise this couldn't be misread as negative but could cause some confusion to the reader).

For some reason trying to work this out has had me thinking of the old joke advertisement "Dining room table for sale by lady with antique legs"
Woubit (Woubit)
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Post Number: 980
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Posted on Sunday, March 07, 2010 - 6:13 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Just to narrow down the many possibilities was the reviewer trying to convey his own enjoyment of the performance or the fact that it was very well received by the audience? Or both even (mind you he'd find it hard to do this in just 4 words) both - the review conveyed general approbation of the production

And just to make sure I have this right
"Charley's Aunt .....ed (meant as adjective read as verb) noun" exactly and precisely so

I feel the noun has to have something one would associate with a play e.g performance, audiance, play, set etc. Am I right in this assumption? no

Is the verb some synonym of liked or loved. no e.g The review might have said "Charley's Aunt adored play" (I realise this couldn't be misread as negative but could cause some confusion to the reader).not this kind of thing

For some reason trying to work this out has had me thinking of the old joke advertisement "Dining room table for sale by lady with antique legs" well, something along those lines will serve. Recall that our poor suicidal hero was trying to learn English...
Docd (Docd)
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Post Number: 99
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Sunday, March 07, 2010 - 7:01 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Was the poor hero in despair because of what he mistakenly thought was a violation of an aspect of English grammar he had been trying very hard to master?

Was the -ed adjective misread as a verb he had learnt was irregular? ("casted" possibly)
Woubit (Woubit)
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Post Number: 981
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Sunday, March 07, 2010 - 3:28 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Was the poor hero in despair because of what he mistakenly thought was a violation of an aspect of English grammar he had been trying very hard to master? no - the review was grammatically correct in every particular

Was the -ed adjective misread as a verb he had learnt was irregular? ("casted" possibly) no, and as a hint, this puzzle is not concerned with grammar; our hero did not shoot himself because he despaired of ever mastering that aspect of the English language
Abc (Abc)
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Post Number: 208
Registered: 7-2006
Posted on Monday, March 08, 2010 - 5:38 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The noun - was it an indeterminate plural?
Would the puzzle be (all but) solved if we managed to get the entire sentence correct?
Woubit (Woubit)
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Post Number: 982
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2010 - 12:44 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The noun - was it an indeterminate plural? no - it was in the singular
Would the puzzle be (all but) solved if we managed to get the entire sentence correct? yes
Abc (Abc)
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Post Number: 213
Registered: 7-2006
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2010 - 7:43 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is the last noun a proper name?
Abc (Abc)
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Post Number: 214
Registered: 7-2006
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2010 - 7:44 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Oh, and there is of course no "the" or "a" (or "an") in the sentence?
Woubit (Woubit)
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Post Number: 983
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2010 - 8:01 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is the last noun a proper name? no

Oh, and there is of course no "the" or "a" (or "an") in the sentence? there is not, but of course the sentence is written in "journalese", so that an article may be understood, as in "Charley's Aunt - [An] Unmitigated Disaster" (though this was not what the review actually said)
Abc (Abc)
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Post Number: 215
Registered: 7-2006
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2010 - 8:15 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

OK. But "journalese" hardly qualifies as "grammatically correct in every particular"?

So, the sentence as it was meant to be read was
Charley's aunt ...ed a [noun]
while our hero understood it as
Charley's aunt is a ...ed [noun]?
Woubit (Woubit)
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Username: Woubit

Post Number: 984
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2010 - 9:03 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

OK. But "journalese" hardly qualifies as "grammatically correct in every particular"? oh, an elision is not necessarily an error

So, the sentence as it was meant to be read was
Charley's aunt ...ed a [noun] not quite - it was meant to be read as in my example:

[This production of] Charley's Aunt [is an] [adjective] [noun]


while our hero understood it as
Charley's aunt is a ...ed [noun]? no - rather, he understood it as:

Charley's Aunt [is] [participle] "[noun]".
Peter365 (Peter365)
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Post Number: 2527
Registered: 1-2007
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2010 - 3:28 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Gosh this is tough.

I know you said the reivew was grammatically correct but is there some sort of grammatical paradox going on e.g. Awfully Good or Terribly Funny?
Is the noun a word for something good like triumph, delight or classic?
Woubit (Woubit)
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Username: Woubit

Post Number: 985
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2010 - 6:44 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I know you said the reivew was grammatically correct but is there some sort of grammatical paradox going on e.g. Awfully Good or Terribly Funny? nothing of this kind
Is the noun a word for something good like triumph, delight or classic? the review was a positive review, certainly - of your examples, "triumph" is reasonably close
Peter365 (Peter365)
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Post Number: 2536
Registered: 1-2007
Posted on Friday, March 12, 2010 - 11:47 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm trying all sorts of possibles out so just want to ask is the verb pass relevant? passed ? unsurpassed?
Oisin (Oisin)
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Post Number: 273
Registered: 12-2008
Posted on Friday, March 12, 2010 - 4:11 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is the verb/adjective of the form "un...", where the attempt to imagine the negative of the verb has flummoxed our reader? Charley's aunt unbridled success?
Woubit (Woubit)
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Username: Woubit

Post Number: 987
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Saturday, March 13, 2010 - 5:55 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm trying all sorts of possibles out so just want to ask is the verb pass relevant? passed ? unsurpassed? none of these

Is the verb/adjective of the form "un...", where the attempt to imagine the negative of the verb has flummoxed our reader? no Charley's aunt unbridled success? no, but "success" is indeed the noun in question. Now, what is a word that can intensify the notion of "success" (or any other notion) yet confuse someone attempting to learn English?
Woodworm (Woodworm)
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Username: Woodworm

Post Number: 1704
Registered: 3-2006
Posted on Sunday, March 14, 2010 - 10:39 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I thought of 'Charley's Aunt Deserved Success', which would carry a double meaning but would hardly prompt a suicide. Let's try it anyway.
Woubit (Woubit)
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Username: Woubit

Post Number: 988
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Sunday, March 14, 2010 - 10:46 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I thought of 'Charley's Aunt Deserved Success', which would carry a double meaning but would hardly prompt a suicide. Let's try it anyway. closeness matched only by cigarlessness
Peter365 (Peter365)
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Username: Peter365

Post Number: 2543
Registered: 1-2007
Posted on Sunday, March 14, 2010 - 7:38 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Unqualified?
Woubit (Woubit)
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Username: Woubit

Post Number: 989
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Sunday, March 14, 2010 - 11:53 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Unqualified? no
Peter365 (Peter365)
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Username: Peter365

Post Number: 2544
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Posted on Friday, March 19, 2010 - 11:14 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Considering that I've been in Prestbury Park all week I have to guess this even though I know it's wrong.

Unbridled?

If not I demand a hint and possibly a steward's enquiry.
Woubit (Woubit)
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Username: Woubit

Post Number: 991
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Friday, March 19, 2010 - 11:50 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Considering that I've been in Prestbury Park all week I have to guess this even though I know it's wrong.

Unbridled? no

If not I demand a hint and possibly a steward's enquiry. well, if you care to look at Oisin's post of Friday, March 12, 2010 - 4:11 pm, you will observe that your horse has already run. Past-post betting is illegal anyway, but past-post betting on losers is also unintelligent, so the stewards may well warn you off Newmarket Heath...

As to a hint, there are more aspects to learning a language than grammar and vocabulary. A conversation that did not actually take place at Prestbury Park, but might have done, went thus: "Paddy, what are ye at now?" "Sure, I'm workin' for Jasus." "What, Jasus Chroist?" "No, Jeyes's Fluid."
Woodworm (Woodworm)
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Username: Woodworm

Post Number: 1735
Registered: 3-2006
Posted on Saturday, March 20, 2010 - 8:30 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is the third word hyphenated?
Woubit (Woubit)
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Username: Woubit

Post Number: 992
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Saturday, March 20, 2010 - 2:16 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is the third word hyphenated? no
Oisin (Oisin)
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Username: Oisin

Post Number: 279
Registered: 12-2008
Posted on Saturday, March 20, 2010 - 3:30 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Not (groans) "Charley's aunt pronounced success"
Woubit (Woubit)
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Username: Woubit

Post Number: 993
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Sunday, March 21, 2010 - 2:45 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Not (groans) "Charley's aunt pronounced success" most certainly - well done

***** SPOILER *****

Our hero, having struggled long to master the intricacies of English in order to gain employment and keep himself and his family from starvation, had thought that he was finally making some progress when he saw outside a theatre a poster that read

Charley's Aunt. Pronounced Success.

The rest, as they say in some other play, is silence.
Peter365 (Peter365)
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Username: Peter365

Post Number: 2548
Registered: 1-2007
Posted on Monday, March 22, 2010 - 12:04 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IPPrint Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Nice one.

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